https://slotsdad.com/ - casino online slots

Big 2011 News…No Really, Part 1

by Administrator on February 3, 2011

Sometimes, new years do start off with significant or noteworthy change in terms of storage technology. January 2010, for example, gave us big advances in storage media — from IBM and FujiFilm,  Type 2 PMR for tape; from Toshiba: bit patterned disk media.

Both are potential game changers in a lot of ways.

The end of January 2011 (and first couple of days of February) have again produced some interesting announcements by both large and small storage software and hardware companies — some of which I have taken some delight in reporting or commenting about in trade press outlets like Network Computing, ESJ.com, etc.

Truth be told, I knew about a lot of these things but observed gag orders imposed by the nice vendors who provided me with advanced briefings — until they could put their own messaging on Business Wire.

I have recently taken to using the intervening time between when I am briefed “on the QT” and when I can wax knowledgeable in public (that is, after the vendor goes public), to shoot a video interview and prep it for presentation on the day of the launch.

Alas, workload put me behind the curve on one bit of important news that came out of DataCore Software in mid January. Ziya Aral, Chief Technologist and Chairman released a study he had performed to get to the bottom of what desktop virtualization actually costs — at least from the standpoint of storage infrasture.

His research is quite different from the benchmarks that other storage vendors have been performing — which seem to be intended more than anything else to justify the expense of their expensive storage gear.

Ziya was nice enough to give me some of his time on camera, and to help me appreciate the importance of his findings. You really need to hear this, especially help you filter some of the growing noise around desktop virtualization and VDI.

The interview is a bit geeky in parts (which I happen to like).  And it goes really well with the report that DataCore produced regarding Aral’s test objectives, methodology and results. Download it from DataCore Software’s home page, or from here if I can get a copy to post at the blog.  (Look for a link shortly.)

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

kubs February 5, 2011 at 8:42 am

hmmmm interesting…. “Can’t sell some screwy technology” … well said !!

Previous post:

Next post: